Thursday, July 25, 2013

NEW K-EDGE TIME TRIAL EXTENSIONS MOUNT FOR GARMIN COMPUTERS


 

K-EDGE Garmin TT Mount-RED_on_Zipp3

K-Edge just announced their newest computer mount, a time trial mount compatible with 22.2mm extensions.  The innovation here is that the K-Edge TT Mount, to accommodate Garmin’s 1/4 turn interface with narrow bar extensions, twists instead of the computer, allowing it to be used between  narrow extensions. Pics, colors, weight and more after the break.



K-EdgeTTMount-BLK_Front ViewK-EdgeTTMount_Gunmetal_Front ViewK-EdgeTTMount-RED_Front View

Available in black, gunmetal, or red, the K-Edge TT mount is made from CNC 6061-T6 anodized aluminium and weighs 37.5 grams.

K-EdgeTTMount-RED_on_Zipp4

The K-Edge TT Mount has a modest reach and drop, which combined with the aforementioned mechanism which allows the mount to twist instead of the computer, keeps it in line with bar extensions.

K-EdgeTTMount-RED_on_Zipp

The K-Edge TT Mount for Garmin computers is compatible with Garmin Edge 200, 500, 510, 800, 810 & Forerunner 310XT, 910XT computers.
Available August 1st, the mount will retail for $74.99

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Tour de France gallery: Time trial tech

http://www.cyclingnews.com/features/tour-de-france-gallery-time-trial-tech-from-stage-11


  • Who else’s but Chris Froome’s (Sky) Pinarello Bolide
    Who else’s but Chris Froome’s (Sky) Pinarello Bolide
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • Tony Martin’s (Omega Pharma-QuickStep) Specialized Shiv is a thoroughbred race winner – and it carried him to his second Tour de France TT win near Mont-Saint-Michel today
    Tony Martin’s (Omega Pharma-QuickStep) Specialized Shiv is a thoroughbred race winner – and it carried him to his second Tour de France TT win near Mont-Saint-Michel today
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • Vittoria ‘Team Prototype’ tyres on the Felt DA
    Vittoria ‘Team Prototype’ tyres on the Felt DA
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • The yellow jersey accents – they were still drying when we visited
    The yellow jersey accents – they were still drying when we visited
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • A hastily modified rubberised Park Tools allen key holder is used as a catcher should the chain unship from his Osymetric rings
    A hastily modified rubberised Park Tools allen key holder is used as a catcher should the chain unship from his Osymetric rings
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • Yesterday Focus launched its new Izalco Chrono frame and today it was in use by the AG2R-La Mondiale team
    Yesterday Focus launched its new Izalco Chrono frame and today it was in use by the AG2R-La Mondiale team
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • Straight pull brakes are recessed into the front fork
    Straight pull brakes are recessed into the front fork
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • Jean-Christophe Peraud’s (AG2R-La Mondiale) saddle is slammed right back
    Jean-Christophe Peraud’s (AG2R-La Mondiale) saddle is slammed right back
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • A specially-decaled Zipp disc - pink, yellow and red – mean it’s grand tour specialist Alberto Contador’s
    A specially-decaled Zipp disc - pink, yellow and red – mean it’s grand tour specialist Alberto Contador’s
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • A specially-decaled Zipp disc - pink, yellow and red – mean it’s grand tour specialist Alberto Contador’s
    A specially-decaled Zipp disc - pink, yellow and red – mean it’s grand tour specialist Alberto Contador’s
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  •  Jérôme Coppel’s (Cofidis) Look 596, fitted with off-spec Rotor QXL rings
    Jérôme Coppel’s (Cofidis) Look 596, fitted with off-spec Rotor QXL rings
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  •  Jérôme Coppel’s (Cofidis) Look 596, fitted with off-spec Rotor QXL rings
    Jérôme Coppel’s (Cofidis) Look 596, fitted with off-spec Rotor QXL rings
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  •  Roman Kreuziger’s SRM PowerControl7 is fitted with a machined aluminium mount
    Roman Kreuziger’s SRM PowerControl7 is fitted with a machined aluminium mount
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • The characteristic tread on the Mavic’s CX01 tyres
    The characteristic tread on the Mavic’s CX01 tyres
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • Hesjedal’s jockey wheels have ceramic bearings – every little helps
    Hesjedal’s jockey wheels have ceramic bearings – every little helps
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • Hesjedal’s jockey wheels have ceramic bearings – every little helps
    Hesjedal’s jockey wheels have ceramic bearings – every little helps
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • Ryder Hesjedal’s P5 in all its glory
    Ryder Hesjedal’s P5 in all its glory
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • The Arundel Chrono bottle cages on Garmin-Sharp’s bikes get a little extra gripper help with self-adhesive foam padding
    The Arundel Chrono bottle cages on Garmin-Sharp’s bikes get a little extra gripper help with self-adhesive foam padding
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • Shimano gave selected riders – including Dumoulin – special edition electric blue R320 road shoes
    Shimano gave selected riders – including Dumoulin – special edition electric blue R320 road shoes
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • The Felt DA’s integrated steering assembly is similar to the Look 596, used by Cofidis
    The Felt DA’s integrated steering assembly is similar to the Look 596, used by Cofidis
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • The Felt DA’s integrated steering assembly is similar to the Look 596, used by Cofidis
    The Felt DA’s integrated steering assembly is similar to the Look 596, used by Cofidis
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • Martin pushed a massive 58T chainring on the flat Brittany course
    Martin pushed a massive 58T chainring on the flat Brittany course
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • A customised Specialized saddle gives Martin the grip he needs to keep putting the power down
    A customised Specialized saddle gives Martin the grip he needs to keep putting the power down
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • Martin’s mechanical SRAM Red shifters provide predictable shifting
    Martin’s mechanical SRAM Red shifters provide predictable shifting
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • The Specialized Shiv frame tapers over the back wheel
    The Specialized Shiv frame tapers over the back wheel
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • Katusha get around the UCI rule barring use of Mavic’s detachable fairings on CX01 wheel technology by filling the channel with a mastic paste bought from DIY shops
    Katusha get around the UCI rule barring use of Mavic’s detachable fairings on CX01 wheel technology by filling the channel with a mastic paste bought from DIY shops
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • Joaquim Rodriguez (Katusha) wins the prize for lowest-slung extensions in the peloton – they’re fitted below the bars
    Joaquim Rodriguez (Katusha) wins the prize for lowest-slung extensions in the peloton – they’re fitted below the bars
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • Rodriguez uses Selle Italia’s only current production triathlon-specific saddle – the SLR Tri
    Rodriguez uses Selle Italia’s only current production triathlon-specific saddle – the SLR Tri
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • The Canyon Speedmax CF Evo uses flattened seatstays to push air around the back wheel
    The Canyon Speedmax CF Evo uses flattened seatstays to push air around the back wheel
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • Cadel Evans was using this un-branded monocoque disc. A Shimano rep told us it was an unbranded Pro Disc they gave some riders for the 2012 Olympics
    Cadel Evans was using this un-branded monocoque disc. A Shimano rep told us it was an unbranded Pro Disc they gave some riders for the 2012 Olympics
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • The Shimano DI2 battery is fixed to specially moulded mounts beneath the bottom bracket on Leopard Trek’s Trek Speed Concept bikes
    The Shimano DI2 battery is fixed to specially moulded mounts beneath the bottom bracket on Leopard Trek’s Trek Speed Concept bikes
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • It’s a tight fit for Markel Irizar’s (RadioShack) PowerControl7 between the extensions
    It’s a tight fit for Markel Irizar’s (RadioShack) PowerControl7 between the extensions
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • Irizar’s new Prologo TT Zero saddle uses gripping material to keep the rider planted when riding on the nose
    Irizar’s new Prologo TT Zero saddle uses gripping material to keep the rider planted when riding on the nose
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • A fleet of new Lapierre Aerostorm has a number of innovations on the previous model…
    A fleet of new Lapierre Aerostorm has a number of innovations on the previous model…
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  •  Including the front brake integrated into the chunky front fork
    Including the front brake integrated into the chunky front fork
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • The fork and frame shape are continuous to smooth airflow
    The fork and frame shape are continuous to smooth airflow
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • Holes in the stem are covered to reduce minute turbulence
    Holes in the stem are covered to reduce minute turbulence
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • The Felt DA’s integrated steering assembly is similar to the Look 596, used by Cofidis
    The Felt DA’s integrated steering assembly is similar to the Look 596, used by Cofidis
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie
  • Phil Gilbert (BMC) was using this plain white saddle. The Selle Italia shell looks modified and re-covered – probably an old Flite
    Phil Gilbert (BMC) was using this plain white saddle. The Selle Italia shell looks modified and re-covered – probably an old Flite
    Photo credit © Sam Dansie

Specialized S-Works Evade aero road helmet – first ride

http://www.bikeradar.com/road/gear/category/protection/helmet-standard/product/review-specialized-evade-aero-helmet-47450

 
Specialized's new S-Works Evade is supposedly aerodynamic and is surprisingly well ventilated as long as you're not on a slow, steep climb

BikeRadar verdict

4 out of 5 stars
"Aero lid that's surprisingly well vented"
Wed 24 Jul 2013, 12:00 pm BSTBy 

  

Road helmets are the latest front in the aerodynamics war, and Specialized has fired a new salvo with the new S-Works Evade. We find its looks to be a little less polarizing than many of its competitors and we've discovered that it's also well ventilated in most situations. If you believe Specialized's aero claims – it's supposed on par with the company's full-blown TT2 model – it all adds up to a pretty compelling lid.
  • Pros: Much better ventilation than expected (as long as you're moving at a steady clip), excellent fit, reasonable weight, only moderately weird looking
  • Cons: So-so heat dissipation at lower speeds, moderately weird-looking
Despite appearances, we found the Evade to be remarkably airy with excellent flow-through ventilation even during late afternoon rides on blazing hot Colorado midsummer days with little wind and temperatures well above 32°C (90°F) – not exactly prime conditions for a helmet whose main draw is that it goes faster through the air, not that it keeps you cool.
The rear exhaust vents are larger than the intake ports on the Evade. Specialized claim this creates enough of a pressure differential to pull air through the deep internal channeling more effectively than with conventional shaping. 
Whether or not that's the root cause, there's undoubtedly much more air moving quickly across the top and out the back than we anticipated, and you can feel the sweat evaporating from the top of your head.
The front profile of the specialized s-works evade helmet is quite trim and riddled with vents, giving little indication that it's designed as an aero lid:
The vented profile doesn't suggest an aero lid
In fact, we felt cool enough for most of the ride that we might say the Evade could outperform some companies' standard road helmets in terms of ventilation at speed.
However, the airflow does fall off substantially when your rate of travel dips below 20kmh (12mph) or so – which, unfortunately, tends to be during hard efforts on steep climbs, when you want that airflow the most. Then, we wanted a more conventional helmet with more openings for passive heat dissipation.
We'll have to take Specialized's aerodynamic claims at face value for the time being, as it was impossible to tell on the road whether the Evade is any faster than a standard road helmet.
Interestingly, though, we did notice much less wind noise than usual, to the point where we were looking at nearby flags checking for a tailwind (there wasn't one). We can't say whether that's indicative of lower drag but we enjoyed the increased awareness of approaching traffic nonetheless.
Potential buyers might have a hard time getting over the Evade's unusual aesthetics, with its droopy and slightly elongated tail. That said, the helmet is quite handsome from other angles, and is particularly impressive head-on, with its very compact profile and tapered edges.
The retention system on the specialized s-works evade is comfortable, height-adjustable, and easily tweaked with one hand:
The retention system is easy to tweak with one hand
Weight is reasonable considering the longer tail and relative lack of vents, with our small-sized, CPSC-approved sample weighing 278g – just 40g more than the Propero II
The Evade is also comfortable, with its slim webbing and ample padding. Plus, the fit is as secure as with other Specialized road helmets. Headform is similar as well, so if you've got more of an oval head than a round one you'll likely do pretty well here.
The Evade's so-so ventilation at lower speeds prevents us recommending it as your sole everyday helmet – it's simply too hot in certain situations. Otherwise, though, its purported aero benefits come with virtually no other sacrifices, so if you're in search of a few extra seconds this would be a good way to go.

Sunday, July 21, 2013

2014 Specialized Product Launch and Dealer Event

 The owners of Rock N' Road took a trip to Copper Mtn, Co. to see the 2014 offerings from Specialized Bicycles. Here are a few pics to hold you over until the products hits the stores.